Las manzanas del Jardín de las Hespérides(11)

Fotocopiadora
Mensajes: 1135
Registrado: 25 May 2013, 09:20

Las manzanas del Jardín de las Hespérides(11)

Mensaje por Fotocopiadora » 27 May 2013, 11:52

Iniciado por morgana Posted 16 February 2009 - 06:27 AM AyR21628
Para ilustrar este trabajo de nuestro héroe, he encontrado una moneda bastante sorprendente ya que corresponde a uno de los imprerios que en el siglo II después de Cristo surgió en las encrucijadas entre oriente y occidente en la ruta del comercio de la seda y las especias.


Es una pieza de oro del imperio Kushán, que se extendió desde Tayikistán al Mar Caspio y por Afganistán hasta el valle del río Ganges, y acuñada a nombre de su emperador Huvishka (años 152-192 d. Cristo).

http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperio_Kush%C4%81n
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kushan_Empire

En sus monedas encontramos simbología religiosa griega, induísta y también budista. Y en este caso en el reverso vemos a Hércules, con su clava en la mano derecha... y una manzana en la izquierda.
Imagen

fuente: http://www.coinarchives.com/a/lotviewer ... 02&Lot=488

Copio la descripción de la moneda...

"INDIA, Kushan Empire. Huvishka. Circa AD 152-192. AV Dinar (7.99 g, 12h). Mint B. 1st emission. PAOhAhOPAO OOhPKI KOPANO (first and second h retrograde), diademed and crowned Huvishka riding an elephant right, holding trident in right hand, goad in left / hPAKILO, Erakilo (Herakles) standing left, wearing lion skin, holding club in right hand, Apple of the Hesperides in left; tamgha to left. Cf. MK 305A/269 (same obv. die/rev. type); Donum Burns -; Triton VIII, 679 (same dies). EF. Extremely rare, only the second specimen known.

Unlike his “imperialist” father Kanishka, Huvishka was a devout Buddhist who spent the majority of his reign making pilgrimages and founding Buddhist monasteries throughout the kingdom. The imagery of this coin’s obverse and reverse reflects both this underlying sense of devotion and the syncretic character of Kushan art. The obverse elephant motif is unique for the gold coinage of the Kushans, although the type is frequent on Huvishka's copper issues. While the Greeks used the elephant as a symbol of might, to the Indians it was a symbol not only of power and strength, but also one of natural wisdom and peace. Such qualities made it a natural adjunct for pro-Buddhist Kushan monarchs. The reverse shows the Buddhist boddhisatva and guardian-guide of the Buddha Vajrapani as Herakles. The choice of the Greco-Roman hero was a logical one: semi-divine, he underwent the Labors as a spiritual purification, and eventually achieved spiritual transformation; his innate strength and ability would be appropriate qualities for the Buddha’s protector.

The name Kushan derives from the Chinese term Guishuang, used to describe one branch of the Yuezhi, a loose confederation of Indo-European people who had been living in the Xinjiang Province of modern China. Driven west by Xiongnu between 176 and 160 BC, the five groups of the Yuezhi – the Xiumi, Guishuang (Kushans), Shuangmi, Xidun, and Dumi – reached the Hellenic kingdom of Baktria by 135 BC. They expelled the ruling Greek dynasties there, forcing these kings further south to settle along the Indus River. In the following century, the Guishuang forced the other tribes of the Yuezhi into a tight confederation. Now, as the Guishuang was the predominant power, the entire group became known by that name. This appellation was Westernized as Kushan, though the Chinese still referred to them as Yuezhi.

Like the Hellenistic Greeks and Romans, the Kushans were a multi-cultural society, incorporating much of the cultures they ruled into their own. Like their Baktrian predeccesors, early Kushan coins used Greek legends on the obverse, along with a translation in the local Karosthi script on the reverse. Beginning with Kanishka I, however, the Kushan language, written in an adaptation of the Greek alphabet with some local alterations, was used almost exclusively. From the time of Vima Taktu (Soter Megas), the Kushans also began to adopt Indian cultural elements. Embracing a wide variety of local Indian and Central Asian deities, they assimilated them with Greco-Roman types already prevalent in the region. Overall, the Kushan pantheon represented a religious and artistic syncretism of western and eastern elements.

An adept military leader who expanded Kushan power throughout much of Central Asia, Vima Kadphises was the first Kushan ruler to send a diplomatic mission to Rome, during the reign of Trajan. Vima Kadphises was also the first Kushan ruler to strike gold coins. Because the Kushans under his reign had extended their protective control over the Silk Road, the Roman gold they obtained through the trading of luxury items with the Roman Empire–such as silk, spices, and other exotic goods–provided the metal for the striking of the first Indian gold coins. In addition to the existing copper and silver denominations, Vima Kadphises introduced three gold denominations: the dinar (struck on an 8g weight standard), the double dinar, and a fractional quarter dinar.

The reverse type of these coins, showing the Hindu deity Siva, known to the later Kushans as Oesho, indicates that Vima Kadphises, like his father and predecessor, Vima Taktu (Soter Megas) embraced the religion of Shaivism, a branch of Hinduism. Shaivists recognized Siva as the supreme god of the Brahma-Siva-Visnu triad, contrary to the more traditional view that the three deities were parts of the Trimurti, the three aspects which make up the supreme godhead. Siva is sometimes portrayed as a figure with a tripartite head and is usually shown in association with Nandi, the bull of happiness and strength. Siva often appears in an ithyphallic state, recalling the ancient and abstract form of the god: that of a conical or ithyphallic-shaped stone, or siva lingam, set within a yoni, a round base with a single projecting channel, which together represented the respective male and female parts and the mystical powers of generation. Likewise, these coins also display the Buddhist Triratana, or “Three Jewels”, on the reverse, indicating that like his son and successor Kanishka I, Vima Kadphises was interested in Buddhism.

While the dinars and their fractions were clearly meant to facilitate international trade, the purpose of the double dinars is less certain. While it is quite possible that they too were used in trade, especially when larger sums were required, their rarity would seem to indicate that they may have served a more special, possibly ceremonial function: gifts presented to the king’s favorites as a way of strengthening support for the regime and deposited resources from which the king could later draw.

Kanishka I, the son and successor of Vima Kadphises, was a fervent Buddhist who convened a great Buddhist council in Kashmir. Its outcome was the adoption and promotion of Mahayana, or “Greater Vehicle” Buddhism, which, unlike Theravada Buddhism, allowed for different levels of Buddhist achievement, placed as great an emphasis on the life of the Buddha as on his teachings, and allowed for the existence of Buddhist “saints”, or bodhisattvas. Kanishka’s special interest in the Buddha is reflected in his use of the Buddha as a reverse type on his gold and bronze coinage.


Huvishka I succeeded his father Kanishka and oversaw a period of consolidation and prosperity. Huvishka was a patron of art and architecture, and his coins reflect the artistic developments of the time as well as the remarkable religious and cultural pluralism of the empire. By the mid-third century the Kushan empire began to weaken and fragment. Upon the death of Vasudeva I in 225 AD, a split into western and eastern halves occurred. The Sasanian Empire under Ardashir I conquered Baktria and northern India. The southern portion of this territory remained under direct Sasanian control, while in the north arose the Kushanshahs, or Kushano-Sasanians, Sasanian nobles who ruled the region as vassals. By 270 AD, Kushan control of the Ganges plain was ceded to the rising Gupta kingdom. By 320 AD, the Gupta Empire was expanding northward, pressing on the remaining Kushan-held territories. During this period, several rebel leaders and generals appeared, further weakening the remaining Kushan state. By the middle of the fourth century AD, the former Kushan vassal, Kidara, absorbed the now-moribund Kushan state and brought it under his control. This new kingdom lasted for only the next century or so, when the Hunnic rulers and later, the Muslims, incorporated it into their own territories"


Imagen
Edited by morgana, 22 May 2009 - 05:24 PM.
Última edición por Fotocopiadora el 29 May 2013, 11:00, editado 5 veces en total.

Fotocopiadora
Mensajes: 1135
Registrado: 25 May 2013, 09:20

Re: Las manzanas del Jardín de las Hespérides Started by mor

Mensaje por Fotocopiadora » 27 May 2013, 11:53

morgana Posted 16 February 2009 - 04:46 PM


**************DECIMOPRIMER TRABAJO DE HERCULES*****************

***********LAS MANZANAS DEL JARDIN DE LAS HESPERIDES***************

Imagen


Edited by morgana, 16 February 2009 - 04:46 PM.
Última edición por Fotocopiadora el 27 May 2013, 12:21, editado 2 veces en total.

Fotocopiadora
Mensajes: 1135
Registrado: 25 May 2013, 09:20

Re: Las manzanas del Jardín de las Hespérides Started by mor

Mensaje por Fotocopiadora » 27 May 2013, 11:54

morgana Posted 22 May 2009 - 05:32 PM
Antes de pasar al mito griego (¡Proser!... ) amplío con un mapa de esa zona del mundo en los albores del año 200 despúes de Cristo:

Imagen

Edited by morgana, 22 May 2009 - 05:33 PM.
Última edición por Fotocopiadora el 27 May 2013, 12:14, editado 1 vez en total.

Fotocopiadora
Mensajes: 1135
Registrado: 25 May 2013, 09:20

Re: Las manzanas del Jardín de las Hespérides Started by mor

Mensaje por Fotocopiadora » 27 May 2013, 11:56

Proser Posted 16 September 2009 - 09:24 PM
Vayan primero mis disculpas porque el calor del verano me ha dejado las neuronas hechas puré y no recordé que se quedó un trabajito pendiente. El jefe Morgana me ha tenido que poner las pilas. Así que, entonado el mea culpa y avergonzada, voy con el penúltimo Trabajo de nuestro héroe preferido.

11. LAS MANZANAS DE ORO DEL JARDÍN DE LAS HESPÉRIDES

Hércules había realizado los Diez Trabajos encomendados en ocho años y un mes pero como Euristeo no tuvo en cuenta dos de ellos, le encomendó dos más.
Como penúltimo Trabajo, Euristeo manda a Hércules que traiga las manzanas de oro de las Hespérides.

Antes de empezar, un pequeño apunte sobre las Hespérides.
Son hijas de la Noche, como las Parcas o Némesis.
La denominación puede ser un patronímico (“hijas o nietas de Héspero”) o tan sólo ser “Las Occidentales”. Hesíodo opta por esta última interpretación mientras que Diodoro, entre otros, apunta a la paternidad de Héspero (o incluso de Atlas y una hija de Héspero). Lo que está fuera de lugar son otras genealogías que las ponen como hijas de Zeus y Temis o cosas sin fundamento.
Las manzanas de oro procedían de un regalo de boda que la Tierra hizo a Zeus al casarse con Hera. El regalo en sí eran unos manzanos que producían manzanas de oro (o bien unas manzanas áureas que Hera sembró en el huerto de los dioses situado en el extremo Occidental del mundo, allí donde Atlas sostiene el cielo, obteniendo así de ellas los árboles de oro.
Como parece que las Hespérides (que custodiaban el huerto) cogían los frutos, Hera puso de guardián a un dragón llamado Ladón, hijo de Tifón y de Equidna. Tenía el dragón cien cabezas, toda clase de voces y hablaba todas las lenguas conocidas; era inmortal e insomne y se enroscaba en los troncos de los árboles que custodiaba.
Las Hespérides eran tres (o quizá cuatro) aunque la iconografía suele representarlas en mayor número. Sus nombres más habituales: Héspere, Egle y Eriteide. (Hay docenas de variantes).
De este Jardín o Huerto son las manzanas que Afrodita da a Hipómenes y la que Paris da a Helena.


Hércules emprende el viaje y llega al río Equedoro, donde combate con Cicno, hijo de Ares y de Pirene; Ares toma parte en la lucha a favor de su hijo, pero un rayo de Zeus separa a los contendientes.
Prosigue su viaje y llega al río Erídano (el Po o el Ródano), y allí unas ninfas, hijas de Zeus y de Temis, le revelan dónde se encuentra Nereo dormido. Hércules lo agarra y encadena, sin soltarlo a pesar de que Nereo toma toda clase de formas (como es habitual en él, deidad acuática) hasta que Nereo le indica el sitio donde están las Hespérides y sus manzanas de oro.
Recorre entonces África, donde lucha con Anteo, siendo esta lucha una de sus más afamadas hazañas fuera de los Trabajos (y que podría tratarse aparte pues seguro que hay base numismática para ello).

A continuación pasa Hércules a Egipto, donde lleva a cabo una nueva aventura al enfrentarse con otro temible enemigo, también hijo de Posidón: Busiris.
Era Busiris rey de Egipto y acostumbraba a sacrificar a los extranjeros en el altar de Zeus, en virtud del oráculo o profecía que le había formulado un adivino de Chipre llamado Frasio, según el cual cesaría la esterilidad que afligía los campos de Egipto si se sacrificaba a un extranjero cada año. Busiris siguió estas instrucciones, empezando por matar al propio Frasio, y continuando con cuantos extranjeros llegaban al país. También a Hércules intenta sacrificarlo, encadenándolo y llevándolo junto al altar, pero Hércules rompe sus ligaduras y da muerte a Busiris y a su hijo Anfidamante. (Hay algunas versiones que discrepan sobre la muerte de Busilis a manos de Hércules).

Prosigue Hércules su viaje, ahora por Asia, llegando a Termidras, puerto de los Lindios, y después a Arabia, donde da muerte a Ematión, hijo de Titono y de la Aurora.

Vuelve a África, recibe de nuevo la vasija del Sol y sale al Océano. Pasa después al continente inmediato, llegando al Cáucaso (el viaje de Hércules sumamente errático, reflejo quizá de las confusas nociones de la geografía del entorno) donde realiza una de sus proezas más famosas: la liberación de Prometeo.
(Este tema sería más adecuado tratarlo separadamente pues el mito de Prometeo es muy interesante; no sé la numismática cómo lo trata pero podría dar bastante juego).

Prometeo, agradecido a Hércules, le hace una revelación, consistente en unas instrucciones, que le serán de suma utilidad para salir airoso de este undécimo trabajo que hasta ese momento no había conseguido Hércules ni empezar siquiera pesar de tan interminables viajes y tan importantes aventuras: le dice cuál es el camino que deberá seguir para llegar por fin a su objetivo, previniéndole además de que no debe ir él mismo hasta el Jardín de las Hespérides, sino solamente a presencia de Atlas, a quien deberá convencer de que vaya él a buscar las manzanas mientras Hércules mismo sostiene la bóveda celeste sobre sus espaldas. De este modo Hércules, con su buena acción de liberar temporalmente a Atlas, se asegura que las manzanas divinas le serán entregadas sin inconvenientes.
Incluso le da un consejo más sobre la manera de engañar a Atlas para que vuelva a cargarse sobre los hombros la bóveda celeste, previendo sin duda Prometeo que Atlas, su hermano, al verse libre de la carga, no iba a querer volver a sostenerla y trataría de dejar a Hércules con ella encima.

Hércules cumple puntualmente las instrucciones de Prometeo y llega a presencia de Atlas.

Atlas es hijo del Titán Jápeto y fue el caudillo de los Titanes en la Titanomaquia; por eso Zeus lo condenó a soportar el cielo sobre los hombros.
Autores como Hesíodo apuntan que Atlas, en pie, sostiene el cielo con la cabeza y con las manos, tarea que le ha asignado Zeus, pero no dice por qué motivo ni afirma tampoco explícitamente que fuera un castigo, aunque esto último sí lo sugiere por el hecho de figurar la descripción de la tarea o misión de Atlas entre las de los castigos que el propio Zeus ha impuesto a Menecio y Prometeo, hermanos de Atlas.
Tampoco hay explicación del por qué de la misión de Atlas en otros autores que sí nos cuentan cómo Atlas, al parecer desde el fondo del mar, sostiene las columnas que a su vez sostienen, por separado, la tierra y el cielo.

Así pues, apenas conocemos cuál es el motivo que origina el mito de Atlas y su eterna tarea de sostener el cielo; pero esta tarea sí es celebérrima y de perdurable influjo en la tradición clásica hasta la actualidad (en el empleo de la palabra atlas para los libros de mapas celestes y terrestres, etc.).

Sosteniendo, pues, el cielo sobre los hombros es como se encontraba Atlas cuando se le presenta Hércules y le convence de que vaya a buscar las manzanas, sustituyéndole Hércules en el sostén de la bóveda celeste.
Pero Atlas teme al dragón y Hércules lo mata de un flechazo. El dragón queda catasterizado en la constelación de la Serpiente.

Atlas coge en el jardín de las Hespérides las tres manzanas de oro que le dan las propias Hespérides, y regresa con ellas a presencia de Hércules; pero, sintiéndose sin duda muy contento al verse aliviado del peso de la bóveda celeste, se niega a cargársela de nuevo, diciéndole a Hércules que él mismo llevará las manzanas a Euristeo.
Y ahora es cuando Hércules hace uso del engaño que le había sugerido y recomendado Prometeo: hace ver a Atlas que accede a su “justa petición”.
Al ver Hércules lo mucho que pesaba el cielo, le pide a Atlas que sostenga un momento la carga mientras él se pone una almohadilla en la cabeza, ya que si ha de estar así unos cuantos meses, necesita un pequeño apoyo. Atlas se ríe y lo tacha de blando pues él no ha necesitado de ningún cojín.
Ha caído en la trampa: deja en el suelo las manzanas y se carga a hombros el cielo, momento en el cual Hércules coge las manzanas y se aleja a buen paso despidiéndose del incauto Atlas que se queda sosteniendo el cielo para la eternidad.

Como sintiera sed nuestro héroe tras el esfuerzo inmenso de soportar el firmamento, dio una patada en el suelo y brotó una corriente de agua que tiempo después salvará la vida de los Argonautas casi muertos de sed en el desierto de Libia.

Hay, sin embargo, una variante según la cual es el propio Hércules el que, llegando hasta el mismo huerto de las Hespérides, coge en persona las manzanas después de matar al dragón que estaba encargado de su custodia. Según esta versión de Apolonio de Rodas las Hespérides se transformaron primero en polvo y tierra y luego en un álamo, un olmo y un sauce.

En cualquier caso, Hércules lleva las manzanas a Euristeo, quien se las regala al propio Hércules; éste a su vez se las da a Atenea, quien, por último, las devuelve a su lugar de origen, por no estar permitido que estuvieran en ningún otro sitio.

Existe una versión del mito en la que es Nereo quien revela a Hércules todo lo necesario para realizar con bien este trabajo ya que el encuentro con Prometeo lo sitúan en el viaje de regreso a Micenas (igual que el encuentro con Anteo).

Este mito supone una forma de sublimación ya que el héroe debe ir hasta el fin del mundo para lograr una manzana que es símbolo de la tierra misma, de los deseos terrenales, y además de oro que es el símbolo de la culminación de los deseos.
Última edición por Fotocopiadora el 27 May 2013, 12:22, editado 2 veces en total.

Fotocopiadora
Mensajes: 1135
Registrado: 25 May 2013, 09:20

Re: Las manzanas del Jardín de las Hespérides Started morgan

Mensaje por Fotocopiadora » 27 May 2013, 11:57

Proser Posted 17 September 2009 - 10:14 AM

Comentando un poco la moneda de apertura del tema, me hace gracia el enorme canasto de manzanas que lleva Atlas a Hércules ¡debió dejar secos los árboles! jajajajaja.

Fotocopiadora
Mensajes: 1135
Registrado: 25 May 2013, 09:20

Re: Las manzanas del Jardín de las Hespérides Started morgan

Mensaje por Fotocopiadora » 27 May 2013, 11:57

DAMIAN Posted 17 September 2009 - 10:53 AM
Ningún rollo Proser, como siempre, muy en tú linea, interesante y ameno, ya te echaba de menos.
Citando a Proser......(En cualquier caso, Hércules lleva las manzanas a Euristeo, quien se las regala al propio Hércules; éste a su vez se las da a Atenea, quien, por último, las devuelve a su lugar de origen, por no estar permitido que estuvieran en ningún otro sitio). Que paralelismo más interesante con la vida misma y la banca.
Imagen

PD.....por cierto buen barco, que lleva su nombre, (Hespérides), el cual he visto en varias ocasiones, en Cartagena, e interesante cometido el que hace. .
Última edición por Fotocopiadora el 27 May 2013, 12:15, editado 1 vez en total.

Fotocopiadora
Mensajes: 1135
Registrado: 25 May 2013, 09:20

Re: Las manzanas del Jardín de las Hespérides Started morgan

Mensaje por Fotocopiadora » 27 May 2013, 11:58

Proser Posted 17 September 2009 - 11:27 AM
Sin duda Damián, que el "Hespérides" es una maravilla.
Muy bueno el símil bancario, jejejeje.


Aquí dejo un poco más de iconografía del momento de la entrega de las manzanas a Hércules.
Se trata de una famosísima metopa del templo de Zeus en Olimpia que es en sí misma todo un hito artístico. Se halla hoy en el Museo de Olimpia, mide 150cm y está fechada en torno al 460 a.C.
Atlas, a grandes zancadas (era enorme, por supuesto), muestra en sus manos extendidas las tres manzanas que a de entregar a Hércules. De este relieve siempre me ha gustado el detalle de la almohada en la cabeza de Hércules. Al igual que en la moneda que abre el hilo, Atenea ayuda al héroe a sostener el firmamento mientras Atlas va al huerto de los dioses.

Imagen

(Siento la mala calidad de la imagen pero al escanearla de mis libros me quedaba aún peor y he tenido que recurrir a Internet, donde tampoco encontré ninguna joya).
Última edición por Fotocopiadora el 27 May 2013, 12:15, editado 1 vez en total.

Fotocopiadora
Mensajes: 1135
Registrado: 25 May 2013, 09:20

Re: Las manzanas del Jardín de las Hespérides Started morgan

Mensaje por Fotocopiadora » 27 May 2013, 12:04

morgana Posted 17 September 2009 - 06:13 PM
Aquí tenemos un bronce romano de Gordiano III acuñado en Cilicia, Tarsos (SNG BN 1667 var.; Ziegler, Kilikien 771) que en su reverso muestra a Hércules recolectando las manzanas (no os perdáis los detalles que identifican a Hércules, como la piel del león en su brazo izquierdo)

http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cilicia
Imagen
fuente: http://www.coinarchives.com/a/lotviewer ... 79&Lot=734
Última edición por Fotocopiadora el 27 May 2013, 12:15, editado 1 vez en total.

Fotocopiadora
Mensajes: 1135
Registrado: 25 May 2013, 09:20

Re: Las manzanas del Jardín de las Hespérides Started morgan

Mensaje por Fotocopiadora » 27 May 2013, 12:05

Proser Posted 17 September 2009 - 09:01 PM
¡Qué chula!
Además de la maza y la piel y la cabeza del león, la moneda nos enseña al dragón (la serpiente) que se enrosca en el árbol ¡mola!
Y viendo a Hércules con las presuntas manzanas en la mano, diríase que presenta la versión según la cuál va él mismo a coger las manzanas.
Lo de la serpiente enroscada en cierto árbol.... qué familiar ¿no?

Fotocopiadora
Mensajes: 1135
Registrado: 25 May 2013, 09:20

Re: Las manzanas del Jardín de las Hespérides Started morgan

Mensaje por Fotocopiadora » 27 May 2013, 12:06

morgana Posted 17 September 2009 - 11:23 PM
Pues entonces este dracma acuñado en Alejandría (Egipto) bajo Antonino Pío te va a encantar mucho más...
Imagen

(la pieza fue subastada en Triton, pero ahora el CoinArchives ha limitado el acceso a subastas antiguas )
Última edición por Fotocopiadora el 27 May 2013, 12:16, editado 1 vez en total.

Responder